Roaring forties and bumping my own version number

A bit cryptic?   “I said Well, I guess”[1]

Somewhere in the back of my head I hear my father talk about some cryptic place on earth, presumably a place he wanted to sail to…. think he did actually, called the roaring forties. So why do I hear this in my head? Simple. I just entered the forties myself. Not the place, but the age. Yup, I just turned 40 years. 40 years… hmmm. Makes one think.

I am older than most of my students even if I switch to using HEX and they in DEC and we simply compare.

When releasing some software with a new “major” version number (e.g going from 3.2 to 4.0) you usually have tons of new features. Well, I (the person) don’t have any new features. Still I bump major version number (3.9 to 4.0).

But quite frankly I guess I don’t care about this whole age thing. I guess I never have. Much better to have fun and enjoy life (enjoy it your way, not via someone else’s expectation) than getting lost in numbers …… Sounds a bit desperate? 😉

… I better go home and pick up the kids and wife and go out and eat and drink.

/h

[1] From Bob Dylan’s song Isis

Workshop: Scripting with bash

Today at IT University (Gothenburg, Sweden) I will do a workshop on scripting with bash. This workshop is the first (beta) of a series of planned workshops organised by  FSCONS and FFKP. More information here:

https://wiki.ffkp.se/index.php/Hacknights_at_IT-U

Invitation text:

Today there will be a workshop in the square of the 2nd year students. The workshop introduce you to scripting, using bash.

When:    April 6, 16.00 – 18.00
Where:   IT University, Building Patricia, floor 4, 2nd year square
Registration: None – just show up

During the workshop, aimed at helping the “embedded project” with setting up automated tests, we will go through:

* hello world
* redirect
* checking return values
* remote commands (with ssh)
* checking out (branching) code under version control
* pipes
* catching output from a program
* making the script run every night (or hour?)
* using settings
* parsing command line options
* writing functions
* evaluating expression
* test if (directory or file exists…)
* writing to a log file
* ….. and much more